Fusion Net FAQ
Networking Related FAQ

Information on how to do some first level network diagnostics to help you and us to resolve any issues.
If you would like to know more additional information, please contact us at support@fusionbd.net;

ISP Network FAQ

The following FAQs are designed to provide information that may assist you to get your service operational as soon as possible. Our common goal is to keep your Internet service operational; sometimes the problems are on your site (or with individual PCs on your site). If we can, together, find the location of the problem or even remove the possible locations of the problem we can get you operational faster. If in doubt call us but we would recommend experimenting with some of the techniques listed below. Finally we recommend that you contact our Customer Care Representatives which will update you the state (and performance) of your local network, your router, our network and the Internet backbone.

Q1. What is a Ping and what does it do?

Q2. I get a failure message from my browser when I try and reach a web site.

Q3. I cannot get my e-mail but I can browse the Internet.

Q4. I cannot get my e-mail and I cannot browse the Internet.

Q5. I cannot access a web site that I accessed yesterday (or last week or last month).

Q6. I get a failure when I try to use Microsoft Explorer to download from the FusionNet web site.

Q7. How do I find out if I am connected to the Internet or not?

Q8. How do I find my TCP/IP configuration?

Q9. What is a domain name?

Q10. What do the Primary and Secondary DNS server names do and why are they necessary?

Q11. Diagnosing Network Problems.

Q12. Important Password Tips that can be helpful in enhancing your Internet Security.

Q13. How I can change my existing password of my FusionNet address.

Q14. Important Antivirus Tips that can be helpful in enhancing your Internet Security.

Q1. What is a Ping and what does it do?

'Ping' (actually its full name is 'ICMP Echo request') is a simple command that may be issued from the DOS Command Prompt (Start/Programs/Command Prompt). Ping tells you if you can contact an IP address. Basically it sends a small message to another computer which causes the receiver to echo back the same message (the message pings forward and back). Ping is the simplest and most useful diagnostic tool to become familiar with and well worth spending a few minutes experimentation. To use Ping 
  1. Run a command prompt (sometimes called a 'DOS box') (Start/Programs/Command Prompt)
  2. Type ping xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP address that you want to check) followed by ENTER. You can also use a URL with a ping e.g. 'ping www.fusionbd.net' but this means the DNS service must be working.
  3. If the ping works (you have successfully set a message to the remote computer and received a response) you should get up to 4 replies  of the form
Reply from xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx: bytes=32 time=yyms TTL=zz
Were xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP address that is responding, yy ms is the time (yy) in milliseconds (ms) that the ping took and zz can be used to calculate the number of routers that it passed through on its journey.
  1. If the Ping failed you will see a message like:
Request timed out
Host unreachable
Network unreachable
Or something similar which indicates a fault somewhere in the network. Note the failure message and contact us.

Q2. I get a failure message from my browser when I try and reach a web site.

There are three possible causes of this problem:
a) The web site is not online or otherwise unreachable.
Can you get to other web sites? If so it’s this web site. You have wait and keep trying it may be down or busy.
b) The DNS server is not available or reachable.
Try 'ping www.fusionbd.net'. If it works you are connected to the Internet and your DNS works so it is the web site or the backbone internet connection. If both fail you may not be connected to the internet so contact us.
c) You are not connected to the Internet.
If a ping to any of the DNS does not work then you may not be connected to the Internet (which may be your connection or it may be your local LAN). Search the other solutions in ISP Network FAQs or contact us.

Q3. I cannot get my e-mail but I can browse the Internet.
This indicates your e-mail server is probably not responding or very busy. If we supply your e-mail, contact us or if not contact your e-mail supplier.

Q4. I cannot get my e-mail and I cannot browse the Internet.
You may be experiencing Internet connection problems. Explore ISP Network FAQs or contact us.

Q5. I cannot access a web site that I accessed yesterday (or last week or last month).
There are many reasons for this if you can browse other sites then it is most likely the web site that is either down or very busy. If you cannot reach other sites then see ISP Network FAQs or contact us.

Q6. I get a failure when I try to use Microsoft Explorer to download from the FusionNet web site.
If you are using Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.00 then you may receive a failure message when trying to download from the FusionNet web site. (To find out which version of Explorer you are using go to the help menu in explorer and click the About Internet Explorer button. The first line has the format 'Version 5.xx.yyyy' xx is the critical version number). To get round this problem you can do one of the following:
a. Download the latest version (> 5.5) of Internet Explorer (www.microsoft.com/ie)
b. Use any Netscape browser.
c. Use an FTP client (e.g. CuteFTP or similar)
If the problems persists after trying any of the above methods contact our support service.

Q7. How do I find out if I am connected to the Internet or not?
Try 'ping www.fusionbd.net' if this works you are connected to the internet and your DNS is working. If it fails see ISP Network FAQs or contact us.

Q8. How do I find my TCP/IP configuration?
There are two methods of doing this - the quick and the long method depending on how much information you want:
The quick method (limited configuration):
  • Load a Command Prompt (a DOS box) (start/programs/Command Prompt)
  • If using Windows '98 enter
winipcfg - this will display your IP address, subnet mask and default gateway (local router)
  • If using Windows 2000/NT/2003/XP enter
ipconfig - this will display your IP address, subnet mask and default gateway (local router)
The long method (full configuration) - Windows '98 and NT/2003, Windows 2K:
  • Click start\settings\control panel
  • Double click 'Network'
  • Select 'Protocols' tab
  • Select TCP/IP then click 'Properties'
  • Navigate to the relevant tab to find the required information.
Q9. What is a domain name?
A domain name is a unique identifier owned (or registered) by an individual or organisation e.g. if a web site is www.mydomain.com then 'mydomain' is the domain name part, the .com of the example is the Top Level Domain (TLD) and the 'www' is a server or service name. Once you own the domain name it is 'delegated' to you via a Domain Name Service (DNS) entry and the domain owner CONTROLS all naming to the left of 'mydomain'. So depending on your company you could create (and give public or private access to) systems with names like myhost.mydomain.com or uk.mydomain.com or plant1.ca.mydomain.com or anything you choose - and have valid DNS entries for. By convention (but only convention) the most commonly used entries are www.mydomain.com (world wide web) and mail.mydomain.com (or pop.mydomain.com or smtp.mydomanin.com).

Q10. What do the Primary and Secondary DNS server names do and why are they necessary?
When you register a domain name the authority for management of that domain is delegated to you via an 'authoritative' DNS (normally at your ISP). The DNS identifiers are defined in the registration record for your domain (DNS names and IP addresses - usually two but can be more) and are maintained in one of a number of centralised DNS that every DNS is the world uses. When your local DNS looks for a name, say, www.mydomain.com and cannot find it locally, it will ask one of these centralised DNS for the information. The centralised DNS will supply back the name and IP address of the DNS which contains the 'authoritative' information for your domain. The local DNS will then interrogate the 'authoritative' DNS for the domain ('mydomain.com') for the specific service or server e.g. www and get back the IP address of the requested service or server. The reason for having Primary and Secondary DNS is for redundancy purposes. A single DNS may become overloaded or even break down, so if the first DNS is not available the second is tried then the third and so on.

Q11. Diagnosing Network Problems.
The following information is supplied to assist you in diagnosing network problems. You may also contact us at any time.
To diagnose a network problem you just start to verify the connections from a known starting point (your PC) moving progressively further into the network until you find the problem:

Always start with your own PC (it regularly fails).
Issue a ping to your own PC (your own IP Address). If this fails restart your PC and try the failing operation again.
Check with someone else in the office - if you are the only person having the problem you have already isolated it to your PC or its wiring. Now you only have to find it - in all cases it is not a remote network problem.
  • Restart your PC - 90% of all problems disappear with this one act.
  • Check the link LEDs on your PC LAN card (if it has any)
  • Check your cabling.
If this still fails we need to find out where the failure is.
In all cases when you call us tell us where you have reached in the above process. It will speed thing up considerably.

Q12. Important Password Tips that can be helpful in enhancing your Internet Security.
Password Tips
  • Memorize your password.
  • You must write down your password in a secret area/place if have any change to be out of mind.
Caution : ---
a. Never write your username and your password on the same piece of paper.
b. Do not place a written copy of your password on the side of your monitor, under your
keyboard, etc.
c. Destroy the written copy as soon as you have memorized your password.
  • Do not disclose your password to anyone.
  • Change your password immediately if you disclose it to someone or you think it has been compromised.
  • Do not allow anyone to look over your shoulder while you are entering your password.
  • Change your password often.
  • Avoid saving your password in programs like auto Dial-in, Auto email check or any other programs which offer to save passwords.
  • Create a good (strong) password.
  • Include both uppercase and lowercase letters (case-sensitive).
  • Include both letters and numbers (alpha-numeric).
  • Do not include your login name, a.k.a. username, in any form (as-is, reversed, capitalized, doubled).
  • Avoid words that can be found in a dictionary (including foreign and technical dictionaries).
  • Do not use a password that has been given as an example of a good password.
Q13. How I can change my existing password of my FusionNet address.
To Changing your password Follow this:
        i. Go to www.fusionbd.net
        ii. Click Change Password
        iii. Type your username in the "username" box
        iv. Type your existing password in the "old password" box
        v.  Type your new password in the "New Password" and "Verify New Password" box
        vi. Then Click Change Password Button

Q14. Important Antivirus Tips that can be helpful in enhancing your Internet Security.
  • Do not open any files attached to an email from an unknown, suspicious or untrustworthy source.
  • Do not open any files attached to an email unless you know what it is, even if it appears to come from a dear friend or someone you know. Some viruses can replicate themselves and spread through email. Better be safe than sorry.
  • Do not open any files attached to an email if the subject line is questionable or unexpected.
  • Delete chain emails and junk email. Do not forward or reply to any to them.
  • Do not download any files from strangers.
  • Exercise caution when downloading files from the Internet. Ensure that the source is a legitimate and reputable one.
     If you are uncertain, don't download the file at all or download the file to a floppy and test it with your own anti-virus software.
  • Save your files on partition other than your windows partition (usually C:).
  • Avoid giving your email address on web pages or forms that ask for your email address.
  • Update your anti-virus software regularly. Over 500 viruses are discovered each month.
  • Back up your files on a regular basis. If a virus destroys your files, at least you can replace them with your back-up copy.
  • You should store your backup copy in a separate location from your work file, one that is preferably not on your computer.

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